Blog

Edge Toolkit: Staying Relevant in the Long Run

Launching a website is just the beginning of a process. Websites need nurturing and care over the long run to stay relevant and effective. This is even more true for a service or tool such as LibraryEdge.org.

Why would users come back if they can only use the provided service once or can’t see progress over time? And how can you put that love and care into the service if it is not self-funded? This month, LibraryEdge.org released a number of changes to address just these issues.

Helping Libraries Stay Relevant

Before we dive into the release, here’s a bit on the Edge Initiative.

With the changes created by modern technology, library systems need a way to stay both relevant and funded in the 21st century. A big part of solving that problem is developing public technology offerings. Even in the internet-connected age, many lower-income households don’t have access to the technology needed to apply to jobs, sign up for health insurance, or file taxes, because they don’t have personal computers and internet connections. So where can people go to use the technology necessary for these and other critical tasks? Libraries help bridge the gap with computers and internet access freely available to the public.

It’s important that libraries stay open and are funded so their resources remain widely available. By helping library systems improve their “public access computers/computing,” the Edge Initiative and its partners have made major strides in making sure libraries continue to be a valuable resource to our society.

That’s where LibraryEdge.org comes in. The Edge Coalition and Forum One built LibraryEdge.org in 2013 as a tool for library systems to self-evaluate their public technology services through a comprehensive assessment – plus a series of tools and resources to help library systems improve their services.

New Functionality

Reassessment

The biggest feature update we recently launched was enabling libraries to retake the Assessment. They can see how they have improved and where they still need work compared to the previous year. To create a structure around how libraries can retake the Assessment, we built a new feature called Assessment Windows. This structure allows the state accounts to control when the libraries in their states can take the Assessment. States now have control over when their libraries conduct the Assessment and can track their libraries’ goals and progress on Action Items. This feature allows states to more accurately assess the progress of their libraries and adapt their priorities and programming to align with library needs.

Edge State

Results Comparison

The Edge Toolkit was initially built to allow users to view their results online, along with providing downloadable PDF reports so libraries can easily share their results with their state legislatures and other interested parties. Now that libraries can have results for two assessments, we’ve updated the online results view and the PDFs. Libraries can now see a side-by-side comparison of their most recent results with their previous results.

edge state 2

Graphs

It’s common knowledge that people retain more of what they see, so we’ve also visualized important pieces of the results data with new graphs. If a library has only taken the assessment once, then the charts will only display its highest and lowest scoring benchmarks. However, if they’ve taken the assessment a second time, they can also see bar graphs for the most improved and most regressed benchmarks.

edge state 3

Improved User Experience

Interviews

We made a number of enhancements based on feedback from libraries that have been using the tool for the past couple of years, as well as from interviews that we conducted with State Library Administrators. Starting with a series of interviews gave us great insight into how the tool was being used and what improvements were needed.

New Navigation

The added functionality of being able to retake the Assessment increased the level of complexity for the Edge Toolkit. So we redesigned the interface to guide users through this complex workflow. We split out the Toolkit into four sections: introduction/preparation, taking the assessment, reviewing your results, and taking action. This new workflow and navigation ensures a user is guided from one step to the next and is able to complete the assessment.

Notification Messages

Several dates and statuses affect a library system as they work through the assessment, such as how long they have to take it and whether it is open to be retaken. We’ve implemented notifications that inform the user of this information as they are guided through the workflow.

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Automated Testing

When we release new features, we need to ensure other components on the site don’t break. Testing this complex of a system can take a long time and will get expensive over the lifetime of the site if it’s done manually. Furthermore, testing some sections or statuses involves taking a long assessment multiple times. In order to increase our efficiency and save time in our quality assurance efforts, we developed a suite of automated tests using Selenium.

What’s Next for Edge

The updated LibraryEdge.org now allows libraries to assess their offerings again and again so they can see how they are improving. Additionally, we’ve built a paywall so Edge can be self-supporting and continue to provide this valuable service to libraries after current funding ends. The launch of this updated site will help Edge remain relevant to its users and, therefore, ensure libraries remain relevant to our communities.